5 minutes reading time (996 words)

TEN REASONS FOR SENDING YOUR POEMS TO MAGAZINES

So I’m flicking through poetry magazines, old and new.

A pile of them on the floor at my right and I’m dipping in and out, out and in. I’m half interested, half bored.

I’ve read this one before at least twice. How come I don’t remember this page? How come I don’t remember this poem, the one I’m reading over and over, startled into absolute attention? Good grief – what a poem, what an astonishing thing in 15 lines! And it stays with me all day, that experience made of words, while all the other poems settle back into a blur, like the grounds in a cafetière after the coffee’s been poured out.

If I go back to that magazine another day (I may or may not, the pile’s still there on the floor) I’ll go straight to that poem, go back for a fix. But maybe there’ll be another one I didn’t see before. There probably will. It happens like that. Poetry magazines are odd things. They don’t read logically. They never do what I expect. Often not what I want either, but that’s okay. They’re stubborn creatures, made by editors who are poets. They’re meant to wake me up, not calm me down.

But I’m thinking in particular about magazines after reading Jo Bell on her method of sending poems out. Which I admired and shared, not least because as a publisher I’m always telling poets to get on with the business, send the poems out, get them into the best magazines they can. Why? That’s the thing. Why?

There are many reasons and they accumulate. There are poets who leap into publication without a previous ‘track record’, but it’s rare. I like the magazine (and sometimes ezine) route. Here are ten (which are not all) of the reasons.

1. Peer validation. If a prospective publisher suspects your poems are good, they do like to have this confirmed by other editors. (It sometimes happens that poems I think are brilliant don’t get into good magazines, but it’s rare). Also publishers do read magazines sometimes and notice the poets in them and nod and note down a name. But this is not the most important of the reasons.

2. Once printed in a magazine, the poems are out there finding readers, which is what poems are for. Someone, somewhere is sitting up in a chair astonished, and thinking ‘Good grief! What a poem!’ That’s one reader. Two readers thinking the same is a readership. Which is what poets need to sail in.

3. In magazines, the poet’s name is bobbing round the waters gathering momentum and recognition. We buy or borrow books (eventually) by people we’ve heard of, not people whose names mean nothing to us (I know there are exceptions, there are always exceptions).

4. The poet who works at getting the poems out there is a member of the community of jobbing poets. It’s part of the apprenticeship, if you like. It’s an honourable striving. If the poems aren’t accepted, the effort is no less praiseworthy. Besides, you’re going to stick at it. You’re going to send them somewhere else. There are many publications for your messages in a bottle to float away to.

5. When you do have a poem accepted, you find yourself between the covers with other poets. You read their work carefully then, especially the ones on pages near you. Most especially the one on the facing page. You feel almost as though you’ve met those poets in person. And sometimes you do. You go to a magazine launch and blimey – there you are sitting next to your facing-page poet. It’s a bond that can last, with luck, a lifetime. We need these bonds.

6. Most magazines (not all) have a bit of bio somewhere or other about authors. If a publisher has offered to do a pamphlet of your poems next year, you can flag the imminent publication in the bio, which is great. It’s another tiny cog in the great wheel of promotion. It may eventually sell a couple of copies.

7. Once your poems are published in book or pamphlet form, the publisher wants the book reviewed as widely as possible. Magazines that run reviews (not all of them do) will generally review poets they’ve published themselves. If they haven’t published your poems (unless your publication is prize-winning or PBS-recommended) you can forget being reviewed. And reviews are another cog in that promotional wheel.

8. Just as a magazine is a creative work made by the editor(s), so a publishing imprint is a creation, and the proud creator wants it to be well-regarded. Publishers work tirelessly for a good reputation, because a good reputation brings the best poets and the best poets strengthen the reputation. Recognition and momentum. Each time one of ‘my’ poets has work in a leading magazine and the bio mentions HappenStance, the imprint's reputation is enhanced.

9. Your first collection is in print. You are still, aren’t you, the jobbing poet, stalwartly sending poems out to the magazines? Someone reads your latest sestina(!) in a magazine and loves it. They look up the bio. They see you have a book in print. They buy it! Yeay!

10. It's hard graft, this regular sending out of poems, but it strengthens you. Yes, rejection of your favourites is demoralising. But there are at least three key aspects to the poetry business. One is the best bit – the making of poems, the joy and excitement and fun of that. Two is getting those poems as good as they can be, which means exposing them to strangers and learning from feedback (rejection makes you look hard at your loved-ones, and sometimes change them for the better). Three is determination. Stickability. Doing the boring business of getting the poems out there. Earning respect because you don’t give up. Paying your dues. Standing up and being counted. You wanna be a poet? This is your job.

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NOT REGRETTING THE GRITTER
SHUTTING UP
 

Comments 13

Guest - Briony Bax on Sunday, 11 January 2015 15:56

Thank you Helena, just shared on the Ambit website.
Happy New Year
Briony

Thank you Helena, just shared on the Ambit website. Happy New Year Briony
Guest - Simon R. Gladdish on Sunday, 11 January 2015 16:42

Dear Nell

If I ever expanded Gladpress to the size of, say, Happenstance, I would publish the best manuscripts that came through my letterbox and I wouldn't care less whether the poems had previously appeared in magazines or not. If there is one thing even more depressing than being turned down by a poetry publisher, it is being turned down by a poetry magazine. Erica Wagner wrote a very good article a few years ago about the British Poetry Establishment's endless attempts to 'tame' poetry and turn British poetry into an arena of hierarchy and patronage.

Best wishes from Simon

Dear Nell If I ever expanded Gladpress to the size of, say, Happenstance, I would publish the best manuscripts that came through my letterbox and I wouldn't care less whether the poems had previously appeared in magazines or not. If there is one thing even more depressing than being turned down by a poetry publisher, it is being turned down by a poetry magazine. Erica Wagner wrote a very good article a few years ago about the British Poetry Establishment's endless attempts to 'tame' poetry and turn British poetry into an arena of hierarchy and patronage. Best wishes from Simon
Guest - Nell Nelson on Sunday, 11 January 2015 17:27

Dear Simon

Don't talk about it. Do it! ;-) Many poets would be delighted by opportunities at Gladpress and all your time could be spent responding to them, instead of leaving unhappy comments on my blog.

Generally the authors of the best ms I get are already placing poems successfully, or if they're not when I first hear from them, they soon will. I like the fact that I often recognise the poets' names when they arrive because I've spotted them in magazines. Not always but often.

Some of my best friends are poets I've met through the small magazines. Those modest publications have, over time, transformed my life and continue to enhance it. I support them by buying them, reading them, recommending them and learning from them.

And I don't believe in the 'British Poetry Establishment'. This is a myth, understandably perpetuated when people feel shut out, though if those people are spirited and determined, they do not remain excluded.

Establishment has salaries and cards and status. Magazine editors have telescopes and sheds. The two could not be more different. This is PoetryWorld, not business. This is the land where people lose money doing something they believe in and it is most unfair to suggest they are all somehow sitting smugly in an establishment citadel. I would say most magazine editors are nutty idealists. It seems likely, Simon, that you are too.

And therefore, as I have said before, please don't rage here about establishments or exclusion. You need to go and start that blog I suggested the last time. You would get some followers because you are not the only person who feels like this. You could call it Poetry Rant. It would be fun!

Or even better, start a magazine. Call that Rant. Stand up for what you believe. Put your money where your mouth is. Join what you see as the establishment and find out how disestablished it really feels.

Enough of this now. I have to go and put some poems in envelopes. ;-)

All the very distestablished best, Nell

Dear Simon Don't talk about it. [i]Do[/i] it! ;-) Many poets would be delighted by opportunities at Gladpress and all your time could be spent responding to them, instead of leaving unhappy comments on my blog. Generally the authors of the best ms I get [i]are[/i] already placing poems successfully, or if they're not when I first hear from them, they soon will. I like the fact that I often recognise the poets' names when they arrive because I've spotted them in magazines. Not always but often. Some of my best friends are poets I've met through the small magazines. Those modest publications have, over time, transformed my life and continue to enhance it. I support them by buying them, reading them, recommending them and learning from them. And I [i]don't[/i] believe in the 'British Poetry Establishment'. This is a myth, understandably perpetuated when people feel shut out, though if those people are spirited and determined, they do not remain excluded. Establishment has salaries and cards and status. Magazine editors have telescopes and sheds. The two could not be more different. This is PoetryWorld, not business. This is the land where people [i]lose[/i] money doing something they believe in and it is most unfair to suggest they are all somehow sitting smugly in an establishment citadel. I would say most magazine editors are nutty idealists. It seems likely, Simon, that you are too. And therefore, as I have said before, please don't rage here about establishments or exclusion. You need to go and start that blog I suggested the last time. You would get some followers because you are not the only person who feels like this. You could call it [i]Poetry Rant.[/i] It would be fun! Or even better, start a magazine. Call that [i]Rant[/i]. Stand up for what you believe. Put your money where your mouth is. Join what you see as the establishment and find out how disestablished it really feels. Enough of this now. I have to go and put some poems in envelopes. ;-) All the very distestablished best, Nell
Guest - Simon R. Gladdish on Sunday, 11 January 2015 21:58

Dear Nell

I shall expand Gladpress if and when I win the lottery. Until then I simply can't afford to, but thanks, as ever for your heartfelt advice.

Best wishes from Simon

Dear Nell I shall expand Gladpress if and when I win the lottery. Until then I simply can't afford to, but thanks, as ever for your heartfelt advice. Best wishes from Simon
Guest - Gill McEvoy on Monday, 12 January 2015 12:11

I love that phrase of yours "an honourable striving". It's a phrase every working poet should keep in mind!

I love that phrase of yours "an honourable striving". It's a phrase every working poet should keep in mind!
Guest - Wayne Hislop on Saturday, 17 January 2015 12:13

Very interesting read, thanks for sharing.

Very interesting read, thanks for sharing.
Guest - Trish Hopkinson on Sunday, 18 January 2015 17:28

I love this article! It's definitely encouraging and is just what I needed to remind me of why I spend so much time submitting and reaching out to other poets. I'll share this on my blog tomorrow! Thanks for taking the time to write and share.

I love this article! It's definitely encouraging and is just what I needed to remind me of why I spend so much time submitting and reaching out to other poets. I'll share this on my blog tomorrow! Thanks for taking the time to write and share.
Guest - Carol Coven Grannick on Monday, 19 January 2015 16:14

I love this validating post. I submit work almost daily and it's a fabulous way to keep the focus on the acceptances, rather than the rejections - which now seem to fly past me without even penetrating my brain or heart. It's so clear that when a piece of work touches the person who's doing the selecting, the match works. When the very same work - just as good, just as polished - reaches someone else for whom it doesn't click, that will be a rejection. I love that this leaves me free to create the best, deepest work, I'm able to - and then send it out into the world.

I love this validating post. I submit work almost daily and it's a fabulous way to keep the focus on the acceptances, rather than the rejections - which now seem to fly past me without even penetrating my brain or heart. It's so clear that when a piece of work touches the person who's doing the selecting, the match works. When the very same work - just as good, just as polished - reaches someone else for whom it doesn't click, that will be a rejection. I love that this leaves me free to create the best, deepest work, I'm able to - and then send it out into the world.
Guest - Nell Nelson on Monday, 19 January 2015 18:13

Carol, you are an inspiration! You are doing THE thing. Keep doing it, please.

Carol, you are an inspiration! You are doing THE thing. Keep doing it, please.
Guest - Aileen Mitchell Stewart on Friday, 06 March 2015 20:11

I'm not a poet, and I envy the skills of those who are. (I can versify at the drop of a hat, but poetry is something else entirely.) i found myself here just rambling through thr web. But I'm glad I did. I've long wondered how to explain to (other) bad would-be poets n online writers' groups what constitutes good poetry. And now, thanks to you, I have my definition: "experience made of words". Thank you.

I'm not a poet, and I envy the skills of those who are. (I can versify at the drop of a hat, but poetry is something else entirely.) i found myself here just rambling through thr web. But I'm glad I did. I've long wondered how to explain to (other) bad would-be poets n online writers' groups what constitutes good poetry. And now, thanks to you, I have my definition: "experience made of words". Thank you.
Guest - Cathy Bryant on Wednesday, 29 July 2015 20:43

A fine article. And I'd add that if anyone doesn't get on with 'the British Poetry Establishment ' ( have I saved enough Green Shield Stamps to become a member yet?) then hey, submit to Anerican and Australian mags. Lots of them pay, too! Full disclosure: I'm the Cathy of Cathy's Comps and Calls ( http://www.compsandcalls.com ) and I love getting writers to start enjoying submitting. I'd also add that all the above applies to free writing comps too.

A fine article. And I'd add that if anyone doesn't get on with 'the British Poetry Establishment ' ( have I saved enough Green Shield Stamps to become a member yet?) then hey, submit to Anerican and Australian mags. Lots of them pay, too! Full disclosure: I'm the Cathy of Cathy's Comps and Calls ( www.compsandcalls.com ) and I love getting writers to start enjoying submitting. I'd also add that all the above applies to free writing comps too.
Guest - Alan Harris on Thursday, 30 July 2015 05:34

A top ten category for poets who submit to magazines and journals...I had my doubts, but you nailed it! I am sharing in the writing friends I have who--if they don't already--will come to understand the validity of all ten reasons to write/submit/repeat.

A top ten category for poets who submit to magazines and journals...I had my doubts, but you nailed it! I am sharing in the writing friends I have who--if they don't already--will come to understand the validity of all ten reasons to write/submit/repeat.
Guest - Harry Owen on Sunday, 05 June 2016 07:48

Good stuff. Necessary stuff. Poetry is work - and not just in the writing of it. I'm currently reading 'Letters of Ted Hughes' (ed. Christopher Reid) and this is exactly the route that he and Sylvia Plath took.

Good stuff. Necessary stuff. Poetry is work - and not just in the writing of it. I'm currently reading 'Letters of Ted Hughes' (ed. Christopher Reid) and this is exactly the route that he and Sylvia Plath took.
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