Happen

Stance

POETRY AND FLOUR

Photograph of packet of Allison's Very Strong White Bread Flour. The packet is green,with the text detail in large white circle in the middle. There is a graphic of an old windmill and Allinson is in large red cursive letters.When baking poems, you should use strong flour, which is made from hard words. This produces the right kind of dough for lyric work produced at high temperatures, because it has a high fluten and bard core content.

Fluten (or high fluten) holds the gas produced when imagination ferments. This is how the poem rises and in this way a highly aerated product with even crumb is achieved. 

Hard word varieties of flour produce the best medium for poems, if ground correctly. However, UK weather does not lend itself to hard-word flowering. Sometimes the mix is fortified by the addition of refined fluten.

Whole-word flour contains the words ‘grim’, ‘endospume’ and ‘flab’.

Refined flour contains only ‘endospume’.

A device called Alveobum Chopkin, invented in 1921 by Maisie Chopkin, provides an index called P that is now commonly used by professional makars. The P index measures the word strength. The maximum of the curve, identified by Y, represents the toughness of fluten, while X represents the bard core. The higher the value of X the more impenetrable the po.

In general, the more a poem requires long gestation, the more a flour will need a high P, because it better supports synxtax produced in fermentation while maintaining elasticity of expression. Fluten is able to absorb complex syntax for one time and half its weight. The stronger the flour is, the higher the absorption. This varies from an absorption of less than 50% for weak flour up to values higher than 70% for strong flour.  ‘Extra strong flour’ may have fluten added.

Under the UK Word and Flour Regulations 1998 (BFR), industrial production requires the addition of certain enrichments (irony, compressin, post-modin and exaspiratin) to all word flour (except soul meal) at the mulling stage.

PUFFING AND PANTING AND PAMPHLETS
The Rhyme Ambush
 

Comments 6

Guest - Clare Best on Sunday, 19 March 2017 08:36

I love this!
Hooray.
Recipes to follow?!
X

I love this! Hooray. Recipes to follow?! X
Guest - Rosie Miles on Sunday, 19 March 2017 08:47

This is completely fabulous. Like some of the best poems, I don't understand every word (not being a strong flour baker), but not needed to get those freshly baked aromas.

This is completely fabulous. Like some of the best poems, I don't understand every word (not being a strong flour baker), but not needed to get those freshly baked aromas.
Guest - Annie Fisher on Sunday, 19 March 2017 09:18

This is great! Any suggestions for poets with syllabic disease who might be allergic to fluten?

This is great! Any suggestions for poets with syllabic disease who might be allergic to fluten?
Guest - Tim Love on Sunday, 19 March 2017 09:24

Cute. I'm a believer in strong flour for the reasons you mention. What's next? How to avoid souffle disasters?

Cute. I'm a believer in strong flour for the reasons you mention. What's next? How to avoid souffle disasters?
Guest - Ama Bolton on Sunday, 19 March 2017 10:01

I love this too, and now you've got me going on sourdough poetry. One of the oldest sourdough poems was excavated in Switzerland and dates from 3700 BC. Rye, of course, contains little fluten, but is rich in pentosameters.

I love this too, and now you've got me going on sourdough poetry. One of the oldest sourdough poems was excavated in Switzerland and dates from 3700 BC. Rye, of course, contains little fluten, but is rich in pentosameters.
Guest - marion tracy on Sunday, 19 March 2017 16:51

Well you obviously enjoyed this extenuated metapflour. Doughing such things is fluten publish core bard.

Well you obviously enjoyed this extenuated metapflour. Doughing such things is fluten publish core bard.
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Thursday, 27 July 2017