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Anti-poetry

FIFTEEN BOLD ASSERTIONS ABOUT POETRY

PHPN7673 Lino print by Gillian Rose

1.   There is no universally accepted definition of what a poem is.   

2.   There is no agreement on what a poem is not.   

3.   Prosody is the study of versification.   

4.   'Versody' is not a word.

5.   Versification is the art of making verses.

6.   A stanza is a verse paragraph. Sometimes it is called a 'verse'. 

7.   A verse is made of verse, and most verse comprises verses.

8.   The canon is not a weapon, and does not have balls, although it sometimes feels as though it is, and does.

9.   Alfred Austin succeeded Alfred Lord Tennyson as poet laureate in 1896. He wrote a verse autobiography, The Door of Humility,
      which nobody alive has read.

10.  The ink used in 99.99% of poetry publications is black.

11.  A list poem is usually formatted vertically and left-justified i.e. it does not list.

12.  If a list poem is entered into the National Poetry Competition, it could be said to have entered the lists.

13.  Writer's block is even in Wikipedia. But this is not a problem. A computer can write poems for you. Here is my latest.

14.  More poets are alive than dead. They thrive.

15.  More poems are dead than alive.

Lino print by Gillian Rose
Recent Comments
Guest — John Peacock
Wrong about no.9
Sunday, 26 July 2020 12:02
Helena Nelson
How, John. I am so impressed! Have you REALLY read it, and all the way through? Maybe I should change the bold assertion to 'that ... Read More
Sunday, 26 July 2020 12:30
Eleanor Livingstone
More poets are alive than dead .... Eh, interesting idea. Might the last 100 years have produced more poets than all of history pr... Read More
Sunday, 26 July 2020 13:05
  4596 Hits
  14 Comments

Reining in the high horse

Do you say ‘weep’ ever – except inside a poem?

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Recent Comments
Guest — Antony Mair
Yes, yes, yes. A couple of others: "beneath" instead of "under" and "within" instead of "inside".
Sunday, 15 January 2017 12:02
Guest — Chris Hardy
Weep: my father, who died aged 92 in 2013 - used to use 'weep' whenever he talked about 'crying'. He came from a mining family in ... Read More
Sunday, 15 January 2017 15:59
Guest — Ruth Aylett
I do use weep in ordinary life occasionally for that state where tears come out of the eyes without any scrunching of the face or ... Read More
Sunday, 15 January 2017 16:39
  4329 Hits
  4 Comments

Dreams and Rejection

So I’m dreaming and in the dream, I’m thinking, this dream wouldn’t make a good poem because it’s stuck.

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The Strangeness of the Present Tense

I pick up the book in my left hand. With my right I riffle through to page 31.

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Recent Comments
Guest — Gill Learner
Good points! Whenever someone takes a poem in the past tense to a workshop there's always one, not always the same, who'll say 'Yo... Read More
Sunday, 20 March 2016 10:59
Guest — Claire Booker
Very well argued point. There are fads in poetry like any other artistic endeavour. Is it perhaps also that we seem to be increasi... Read More
Sunday, 20 March 2016 12:50
Guest — Helen Ashley
Talking of 'analysing', Claire, I find it very strange to listen to post-rugby-match analysis, with present-tense analysis such as... Read More
Sunday, 20 March 2016 14:21
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  7 Comments

A LAMENT FOR RHYME

On the absence of rhyme during the reading window

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Recent Comments
Guest — Annie Fisher
The only poems I can write are brainless rhyming ditties, And if you lot don't like them then I'm sorry, it's tough titties! Sorr... Read More
Sunday, 20 December 2015 11:37
Guest — Nell Nelson
I nearly SAID 'All comments on this blog' should be rhymed. So this one was well-timed. ;-)
Sunday, 20 December 2015 11:42
Guest — George Simmers
Thanks for the honourable mention, Nell. You state the would-be rhymer's problem well. Though in Italian, most words rhyme with m... Read More
Sunday, 20 December 2015 14:20
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  9 Comments

THE INCONVENIENCE CAUSED

The question is: what is ‘the ‘caused’ doing?

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Recent Comments
Guest — Annie
It does sound odd when you think about it. Maybe the message should be: ‘We are sorry for you.’ Never mind feeling sorry for the i... Read More
Sunday, 07 October 2012 09:41
Guest — Nell Nelson
Thank you for the comment caused...
Sunday, 07 October 2012 09:55
Guest — Mike Munro
It's not just the language that is redundant, it's also the sentiment. Who is sorry? No particular individual feels much penitence... Read More
Monday, 08 October 2012 09:31
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  4 Comments